Guardhouse
Fezna, Morocco
2018
House in Relief

From the top of the hill, all three sculptures are visible.  Just below, set into landscape is a plinth made of stone.
Through its materiality, it assumes the texture and color of the place, however its proportions are based on a perfect square.  
It is both a natural and an imposed figure.

The plinth is wrapped by a low perimeter of stone, which follows the sloping terrain.  
Lightwells pressed into the surface create a separation of volumes and functions.  
One descends below the plane of the desert, finding surfaces which are smooth and light-colored.
Light enters from above.  Entryways, windows and rooms are set in relief - deep recesses of shade.

Guardhouse
Fezna, Morocco
2018
Expo Pavilion
International Competition (Finalist)
2018


Post Oil Oasis 
 
 
In a region known for excess, what is the outlook for a land primarily dependant on fossil fuels? 
What can a contemporary oasis offer, especially in a time of energy scarcity?
 
In light of this regional relevance, the Oman Expo Pavilion dedicates itself to the theme of Earthen building
and its potential to create comfortable, contemporary spaces, rooted in the traditions of the land.  
Drawing from the terrain and materia prima of Oman, the result is an ensemble of subtle structures
which offer superior performance despite its low-tech construction. 
 
Distinguished by neither the gilded towers nor the globalized political power of its neighbours,
Oman’s primary distinction is its uninhabited landscape: deep rugged canyons, natural pools
and the cool shade of the palmeraie – qualities which underpin the experience of the Pavilion.
 
The primary construction material (earth) is acquired through excavation and can be naturally
returned to the ground or recycled once the exhibition has concluded. 
Emphasis is placed on maximizing the natural properties of earth
(thermal mass and humidity regulation) without the addition of cement.
 
An introverted facade suggests qualities which reveal themselves from within.  
Similarly, the urgency and the allure of Oman lies in its unknown.


(in collaboration with Cesar Cano Diaz)

Expo Pavilion
International Competition (Finalist)
2018


Khusuf Table
2018
Top from ebonized Sapele
Legs of solid Omani limestone 
Heavy as hell.
Khusuf Table
2018
Guesthouse
Nakhal, Oman
2018
Heritage House
Al Amarat, Oman
2017
An extended family seeks to ressurect the ruins of their patriarch
and in doing so create a place to gather and celebrate their heritage
To rebuild the physical and familial structure

Heeding the former footprint, a series of new volumes emerge -
each with different heights, different proportions
speaking with one another while keeping a proper distance

The resulting tension between these masses become moments of respite
a place for plantings to reach upward
a long strip of shade between the cool plaster surfaces

Perimeter wall, garden, portal and room all become audible figures
picking up where the former house lost its voice.
Lines of sight are carefully calibrated. Corridors usher visitors comfortably inward.
A heavy wooden door closes with certainty.

At the heart of complex is the majlis, the private gathering area for the family
a slender attenuated room, indirectly lit.
One descends into the room, feels obliged to sit and gaze upwards.
The feeling of arrival.
Heritage House
Al Amarat, Oman
2017
Al Hail Villa
Muscat, Oman
2017
FF House
Mdabulo, Tanzania
2016
The volume of earth is embedded firmly into the hillside.
the form rounded, its rough surface carved into crisp edges
like the prow of a ship.
 
The house responds to the natural fall of the hillside
traversing the slope, arriving at different levels .
The movement within is circular - enabled by a rigorous geometry.
 
Openings are apertures in the massive walls
No commanding vistas, rather oblong views.
 
A singular large oval opening is placed incongruously at a corner
Not a window, but an oculus
allowing daylight to fall quietly across the pale surface of the interior.




FF House
Mdabulo, Tanzania
2016
Cultural Center
Bamiyan,  Afghanistan
2015
نوي چارې په زړې لارې
Innovations through an old way (are best)
-Pashto Proverb


Nestled along the southern cliff of the Bamiyan valley, the new cultural center lies embedded in the history and steep topography like unearthed shards of pottery.  Within the embrace of the terrain, the buildings traverse the natural curve of the ridge stretching in the direction of a single monolithic tower situated at the north end of the site, which serves as the performance space.  Unlike the other buildings, the tower emerges from the landscape- prominent and vertical, its form reminiscent of the niches on the opposing cliff.  A sentinel to the ongoing culture of Bamiyan.

Echoing the qualities found in the indigenous caves of Bamiyan, the experience of moving through the Exhibition galleries is one of descent and shifting light.  The vaulted structure of the galleries rise upwards as a series of ramps descend into the rock face.  Arcs of light wax and wane in proportion to the gently sloping roof - the quality of the light changing as one moves further into the past - towards the roots of Bamiyan’s antiquity.  Despite its regularity, the galleries offer multi-faceted opportunities for exhibition. Ramps overlooking spaces create unique perspectives above and below artworks.  Large-scale pieces stand freely in the open plan galleries, while sensitive artifacts can be displayed in niches or intimate domed rooms.

In collaboration with Tobias Fritz and Timur Ersen.
Cultural Center
Bamiyan,  Afghanistan
2015
Two-Room Earthen Pavilion
Abetenim, Ghana
2012
The Two-Room Pavilion was constructed in 6 weeks
by a team of 5 people in rural Ghana. 

A volume of rammed earth flanked by a free-standing wall of the same material
creates two spaces: one enclosed and one exposed. 

The boundaries of the pavilion are delineated by the floor and roof planes,
which protect from the heavy rains and intense sun. 

From one eucalyptus tree, the three roof trusses were produced.

The construction embodies a distillation of building elements:
Plinth, Wall, Opening, Lintel and Roof.

Earth and Enclosure.
Two-Room Earthen Pavilion
Abetenim, Ghana
2012
Pavilion Harp
New York, USA
2012
Centrally-located within a leafy park, a neglected Pavilion is re-imagined
as a body in resonance.

Taut wires hold bridge elements against the surface of the ceiling,
allowing the chamber within to resonate. 

The evening performances consist of movements within the gentle measures
of the collunade.

The lengths of wires are framed and illuminated within the curvature of the structure.

By way of this intervention, the pavilion speaks to us in a new language, 
not via its neo-classical ornamentation but rather through the reverberations of its inherent form. 

Finalist, BMW Guggenheim Lab
Pavilion Harp
New York, USA
2012
Air Force Memorial Chapel and Garden
San Antonio Texas, USA
2010
A shape with significance, the triangle provides focus and unity,
equality among parts and strength as a whole. 
The plan is arranged in accordance to this significance.

The entrance to the chapel is full of light -
radiant and shimmering off the surface of the reflecting pool and stone tiles. 
One seeks shade from the brilliance.

From the Narthex, a long ramp descends,
leading worshippers deeper into the dimly lit interior

The Sanctuary reveals itself as a tall, earthen room illuminated by 3 chambers of light:
the Choir, Blessed Sacrament and entrance to the Sacristies
Each golden alcove glowing warmly within tall perforated screens

Here the light is focused and luminous.
We are drawn towards it.

Lanterns in the shady, earthen room. 



In collaboration with Vanessa Carreras
Air Force Memorial Chapel and Garden
San Antonio Texas, USA
2010